Contrary to popular belief, sunglasses are not just for when it’s warm. Here at Ape, we’re constantly baffled as to why the squinting masses don’t just commit to a great-looking pair of shades and carry them everywhere as a daily essential – just like they do with normal spectacles.

Not only are sunglasses a constantly neglected chance to add flair, personality and a general sense of unwavering cool to an outfit, they’re also imperative for keeping your eyes healthy. Blocking damaging UV rays – whether on an unexpected sunny winter’s day or at the height of summer – is important. Doing it in style is even better.

Comprising timeless designs and contemporary icons, below we’ve pulled together our edit of the best sunglasses styles for 2019. Trust us, all that squinting is going to give you wrinkles.

Purchase Considerations

First, here are a number of things you should consider carefully before committing to a new pair of sunglasses, from face shape to lens quality.

Face Shape

Kirk Originals

The sunglasses face shape debate is a minefield, but there are certain conventions to follow. If your face is longer than it is wide – with softer lines around your cheeks and jaw – the last thing you want to do is make it appear longer, so avoid anything too small or John Lennon-like. Luckily, the rest of the sunglasses world is your oyster, so feel free to choose between square and rounder styles, with oversized and drop (think aviators) silhouettes working particularly well too.

For the rest of us, the rules are a little trickier. Round and curved styles help soften sharper facial features such as pronounced cheeks and squarer jaws. Square frames with rounded corners can also work, but too much geometric shaping can emphasise your angles and appear quite brutal.

Square faces (similar length and width) lend themselves to rounder styles, while rounder faces will benefit from a bit more structure and definition. If ever in doubt, the classic Wayfarer is a universal style that works for almost all men, so start from there.

Frames

Cubitts

When comparing frames, it’s worth considering colour, material and detailing. Certain features, such as a double bridge or thicker rims, will accentuate particular parts of the face, drawing attention to a bushy brow or chiselled cheek bones. Bold colours have a similar effect, although it’s easier to get away with a splash of colour on a thinner frame. Tortoiseshell, black and metal frames are timeless options that will never fall out of style.

Acetate and metal are the go-to frame materials for most (read: high quality) sunglasses on the market; the former being stronger and lighter than cheap, moulded plastic versions, ensuring increased durability and comfort. Metal frames, meanwhile, offer increased malleability and adjustability, lending themselves to thin and minimal designs.

Any eyewear brand worth its salt will provide you with a free protective case, so use it. It will limit scratching and damage to both your frames and lenses, ensuring longevity.

Lenses

Oliver Peoples

The bottom line when it comes to lenses is protection. Opt for those that offer full spectrum (100%) UV-protection, checking for the “CE” logo which guarantees they meet fundamental protection standards.

Polarised lenses are designed to block glare and help with contrast, as do some tinted versions. Mirrored and coloured lenses provide a fashionable option and feature heavily in this season’s collections. However, be aware that what is trendy today will usually fall out of favour tomorrow, so if you want value for money stick with traditional lens colours like black, grey, green and brown gradients.

Key Sunglasses Trends

Coloured Acetate

Kirk Originals

Traditionally speaking, sunglasses have always been pretty simple in terms of colour variations. Your choices are typically limited to black or, if you’re feeling dangerous, tortoiseshell. With this in mind, it was only a matter of time before people began to demand something bolder and brighter – and their calls are finally being answered.

You’re probably thinking this isn’t the eyewear trend for a discerning fellow like yourself but remember, colourful needn’t be a synonym for crude. Think earthy browns and greens; translucent navy and grey; burnt orange and maroon. Exercise restraint and it’s a great way to bring a pop of personality to an otherwise minimalist outfit.

Transparent

Oliver Peoples

Naturally, sunglasses are transparent. Were they not, we’d routinely find ourselves bumping into things and getting lost on the way to the shops. Well, that’s true in terms of lenses, but frames on the other hand have always tended to be opaque.

Not anymore. For a few years now, see-through frames have been on the rise and this year they’re firmly established as one of the key eyewear options worthy of consideration. It’s simple, yet different; plain, yet striking; and a nice way of lending classic silhouettes a contemporary edge.

Sporty Silhouettes

Mykita + Maison Margiela

The endless trend cycle is unconcerned with our opinions. No matter how much we might want to believe that certain styles are beyond revival, sooner or later they’ll bob back to the surface. Case in point: sporty, aerodynamic shades.

Nobody is going to tell you that wraparound shades are timeless or essential. What they are, however, is one of the biggest eyewear trends of the moment. If you’re keen to retain your dignity, it’s probably best to avoid restocking your entire sunglasses collection with frameless Oakleys but on the plus side, your cycling outfit just got a little bit cooler.

Geometrics

Ray-Ban

Round or square. Unless you’re Elton John, that pretty much sums up the realistic options when it comes to picking a shape for your sunglasses. But that’s all beginning to change.

Geometric sunglasses are emerging as a major trend. It might sound tacky but many of the subtler styles with softened corners and hexagonal frames are surprisingly wearable. Ray-Ban has some excellent examples, or if you’re after something a bit more striking, take a look at the jagged, angular frames now being offered by the likes of Saint Laurent and Burberry.

Collaborations

Garrett Leight x Rimowa

There’s no escaping collaborations when it comes to modern menswear. Joining forces with other designers has become an important way for brands to increase their reach, but until recently eyewear seemed to be largely untouched.

Lately, though, a wave of sunglasses collaborations is sweeping the industry. Fashion houses, dedicated eyewear brands, streetwear labels and even camera manufacturers have been making jointly-designed eyewear one this year’s key trends. For examples, look to the recent offerings from Persol x A.P.C, Garrett Leight x RIMOWA, MYKITA x Leica and Native Sons x Sacai.

The Coolest Sunglasses On The Market

Featuring all of our favourite eyewear brands in one carefully curated edit, each of the designs below guarantee quality, style and protection in abundance, so you can feel completely confident in your purchase.

Ray-Ban

Key Frame: Folding Wayfarer Classic

Times may change, sea levels may rise, the doomsday clock continues to tick… but no matter what happens, the Ray-Ban Wayfarer will be a foolproof choice that never dates. Opt for classic tortoiseshell frames with light brown gradient lenses and you’ll be in good company: everyone from David Beckham to JFK to Leonardo DiCaprio has been seen sporting them over the years.

We’ve gone for the practical, foldable option as it’s a lifesaver being able to slot them into a pocket when you’re on the move.

£131.00; Ray-Ban

Moscot

Key Frame: Zolman Sun

Iconic eyewear from an iconic New York family. For decades Moscot have created some of the most immediately recognisable spectacles on the market, adorning the faces of Big Apple royalty and trendsetters alike. The Zolman Sun is a classic round lens style from the brand’s archive that is great for square and oval face shapes.

We particularly like the clear frame version with green glass lenses, handcrafted using Italian acetate and incorporating subtle Moscot branding to the arms.

£248.00; FarFetch

Persol

Key Frame: 714SM Steve McQueen

Originally a maker of eyewear for pilots, lightweight aviators are Persol’s bread and butter. Steve McQueen’s choice of sunglasses, the brand has released a limited-edition version of its iconic 714 frames, featuring all the same details of the original model sported by the actor in The Thomas Crown Affair (1999). If they’re good enough for The King of Cool, they’re good enough for us.

£319.00; Persol

Tom Ford

Key Frame: Marko Aviator Polarised

You can’t beat Tom Ford when it comes to tinted aviator swagger. The designer’s Marko shades are made in Italy and ooze 1970s cool, coming in on-trend rose gold with grey gradient polarised lenses. Ideal for longer and rectangular faces.

£300.00; TOM FORD

Oliver Peoples

Key Frame: Cary Grant Sun

Producing meticulously crafted eyewear since 1987, Oliver Peoples’ glasses continue to be designed and created in their studio in West Hollywood, California. The Cary Grant Sun is inspired by the signature style worn by its namesake in the 1959 cinematic classic North by Northwest. Custom design details help to maintain the integrity of the original model, but quality is given a substantial upgrade thanks to the use of handcrafted custom acetate, hand-laid functional pins and polarised lenses.

£322.00; Oliver Peoples

Cutler and Gross

Key Frame: 1341

Since their inception at the tail end of the 1960s in swinging London, Cutler and Gross have built a reputation on producing creative, handcrafted frames using the very best Italian acetate. Their oversized 1341-03 square sunglasses are a fashion-forward statement, coming in a striking yet wearable “sherry” colourway and featuring a 9mm milled laminated acetate structure to eliminate weight, making them extremely comfortable despite their size.

£315.00; Cutler and Gross

Monokel

Key Frame: Barstow

It’d be nice if we could all afford to spend upwards of £150 on a pair of sunglasses. Sadly, that’s not the world we live in, but that doesn’t mean you should settle for less. If you do find yourself struggling to find a quality frame within your budget, allow us to point you in the direction of Swedish manufacturer Monokel.

Using premium plant-based acetate, Monokel creates stylish sunglasses that keep prices down without compromising on quality. With it’s chunky, circular frame the Barstow is one of the brand’s hero styles and looks particularly handsome in trending green tortoiseshell.

£89.00; End Clothing

Saint Laurent

Key Frame: SL 1

Known for their unconventional shapes, oversized silhouettes and refined luxury, Saint Laurent’s shades have been firm favourites of A-listers and fashion insiders for decades. Granted, many of the styles take some serious confidence to pull off, but not all high-fashion frames are exercises in outlandishness.

Take the SL 1 for example. This oversized, contemporary take on a classic Wayfarer style somehow manages to be both bold and restrained. It’s simple, but it commands attention, which is perhaps why it’s one of the Parisian brand’s most popular and iconic designs.

£320.00; Harvey Nichols

Gucci

Key Frame: Aviator

Gucci began life, as so many fashion houses do, producing luxurious luggage for the upper classes. Today it’s a multifaceted high-fashion powerhouse that produces, among many other things, some of the world’s most sought-after shades.

Gucci’s take on the classic Aviator style has long been the label’s signature frame. It’s been reimagined in chunky acetate, subtle wire and just about every colour of the rainbow. Still, for what it’s worth, this simple gold and black top-bar version is the clear winner for us.

£320.00; MATCHESFASHION

Garrett Leight

Key Frame: Brooks Sun

Los Angeles, California. People call it the City of Angels, but we think the City of Sunglasses would be equally fitting. LA’s position as the global capital of film has seen it become a hotspot for celebs in shades, but also for the brands that make them. Garrett Leight is one such name.

Named after its founder and son of fellow LA eyewear label Oliver Peoples, Garrett Leight produces some of the finest frames in not just the city, but the world. Take the Brooks Sun for example. This square-framed style is one of Garrett Leight’s bestselling models, featuring a distinctive key-hole shape.

£245.00; MR PORTER

Thom Browne

Key Frame: Round Lens

When it comes to interesting and stylish round lens sunglasses, Thom Browne is the master. Combining minimal metal frames with contemporary twists on shape, the American designer’s circular shades demand a double take. Our pick of the bunch, above, are handmade in Japan using silver and gold-toned metal and feature subtle yet striking brow bar detailing as well as Browne’s signature tricolour stripes. A modern classic.

£579.00; End Clothing

Cubitts

Key Frame: Tonbridge

Founded in King’s Cross, London in 2013, fledgling British brand Cubitts pride themselves on craftsmanship, with every pair of sunglasses going through 50 stages of production over a six-week period. Their Tonbrudge design has been inspired by modern literary figures of the 1960s and features a flat brown bar and keyhole bridge, adding a point of difference to an otherwise round shape. Available in 11 colourways, the slate grey version offers a versatile alternative to classic black frames.

£125.00; Cubitts

Kirk Originals

Key Frame: Hays

 

Another iconic sunglasses brand that prides itself on frames handmade in England, Kirk Originals are a go-to if you’re looking for classic shapes in timeless tortoiseshell colourways. Extremely wearable and with a satisfying weight to them, their Hays model is a slightly oversized, round lens silhouette that is as dynamic as it is elegant. We particularly like the dark blue gradient lenses.

£235.00; Kirk Originals

Dior Homme

Key Frame: Chroma 1

 

Kim Jones is a visionary designer that continues to push the boundaries of menswear, and he has brought this long-standing ethos and creativity to his new position at Dior Homme – as proven by the brand’s eyewear output this season. The Chroma 1 pilot-style frames come in silver-tone metal complete with brow bridge, mirrored grey lenses and transparent side spoilers. Not everyone will be able to pull them off, granted, but they make for one hell of a style move.

£379.00; Dior

Mykita

Key Frame: Paulin

German eyewear brand Mykita specialises in cutting-edge styles distinguished by a progressive approach to form, construction and materials. This adds up to some truly distinctive designs that you will not find elsewhere, all featuring the latest in eyewear technology. Handcrafted in their home town of Berlin, these Paulin sunglasses – in a not-often-seen navy shade complete with striking orange detailing – are made from lightweight stainless steel and feature silicon temple tips and nose pads for comfort as well as a patented spiral hinge that makes them individually adjustable for a secure fit.

£389.00; Mykita